wedding photography

When Neda and Sanjit’s cross-cultural wedding photography assignment landed in our inboxes, we were confused, amazed and mesmerized at the beauty of this celebration! This couple’s whose love wasn’t subject to religion or caste decided to celebrate this cross-cultural wedding in three distinct ways. They first had a Gaye Holud, followed by a Bengali wedding ending the celebrations with a European themed reception. The team at Wedding Photo Creators shot this crazy-fun wedding brilliantly. Photographing and filming those candid moments, those secret laughs and so much more perfectly! Scroll on to see how Neda and Sanjit nailed a special kind of cross-cultural wedding occasions brilliantly.

 

When the bride and groom come from different cultures or different parts of the world, the Big Fat Indian Wedding is being filled with unexpected surprises.

Neda, 30, a project manager for an international oil and gas conglomerate, is a Persian lady. Sanjit, 35, an entrepreneur based in Dubai, is Bengali. The two met at Dubai, during a conference.

Both sets of parents were perfectly okay with the idea, except for one thing: What kind of wedding would a Persian lady and Indian man have? Both families were enthusiastic about participating in all the rituals for both the weddings. The fun of mixing two cultures has continued even after the wedding. The thing about dreams is that you need to work towards making them a reality.

Sanjit’s ancestral house is in Mumbai Shivaji Park and Neda is from Tehran. Both places are not only different demographically, but different in psychographic and all other aspects. But Neda’s family accepted all the loudness of  Indian cultures and the wedding was performed in a typical Bengali way which was very difficult from other weddings in Mumbai.

In the next blogs, we will discuss the rituals performed in those days. Now just scroll down to see some amazing pictures of this grand event.

“Wedding is about the two people apprehensive, and in the long run, culture plays a very limited role,” says Neda. “You deal with each other’s likes, dislikes, fears, hopes, and dreams, irrespective of where the other person is from. Even today, I am a curtail Persian Islam and Sanjit is a curtail Bengali Hindu but that has not affected our association in any way. In fact, I think cross-cultural weddings make the best babies – they’re fast developing and a lovely amalgamation of both sides.”

Most cross-cultural couples plan suitably cross-cultural weddings, but Neda insisted on an Indian experience, elephant et al.